What does HR mean to an outsider? A simple analogy.

HRInsights is fortunate to have two impressive interns working withe us this summer, Kyla Kelly and Lizzy Rewalt. In this post Lizzy, soon to be a junior at the University of Michigan, shares her impressions as a young person interviewing for the first time…Good perspective for business owners and HR…

As an undergrad, and newly immersed into the business dating world (or, as some would call it, ‘job searching’), I have quite a bit to say about HR practices across different companies.

The varying processes created by each company for hiring, and the standards associated with each directly impact my desire to work for them.  When a company fails to realize the importance of the candidates they are looking to hire, they are indirectly telling the candidate:

  1. “We, the HR department, will not be interested in developing a relationship with you, or helping you grow professionally”
  2. “Our lower standards for hiring directly correlate with the low quality of our current employees/your potential future co-workers”
  3. “The inefficient operation of our HR department is suggestive of inefficiencies elsewhere in the company”

On the contrary, a company that pays significant attention to the hiring process will attract conscientious candidates who are eager to demonstrate and deliver on their value.  A cycle of excellence and mutual respect will begin, leading to more positive growth for the company.

The best interviews I’ve had were the most engaging and challenging.  Interviewers who are prepared, (or just talented at impromptu BS-ing) will not only reap the most benefit from the interview to gauge if a candidate is a right fit, but they also set a high standard for future candidates that will flock to their company.

I’ve seen this theory congruently proven throughout my undergraduate experience.  My business fraternity’s (Alpha Kappa Psi, Phi Chapter at the University of Michigan) ‘hiring’ process is intricate.  Recruitment is the single-most important aspect of our organization because our people create our success, (a theory that should be similarly upheld in the business world).  The more we expect from our candidates, the more the fraternity grows.  Our members dedicate days of their time to recruiting: seeking out prospective candidates, preparing events, maintaining contact with candidates, interacting with them, reviewing their qualifications, and voting on the final selection.  In return for our dedication to this process, we have seen more involvement and loyalty from our selected recruits.  Recruitment periods that weren’t taken as seriously by the current membership resulted in a fade-away and disappearance of the selected candidates over time.

Whether you can measure it quantitatively or not, conducting your HR department properly and efficiently will only result in a greater ROI for your business.

Care about your business.  Care about your HR.

(Startupnation thinks so too: http://www.startupnation.com/articles/1399/1/human-resources-small-business.asp)

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