Tag: staffing

To Hire or Not To Hire

With only 2 months left in the 4th Quarter, many business owners are now looking at tasks that need to be completed before year-end and also with an eye towards 2013 goals and objectives.  Both year-end holiday needs and 2013 goals and objectives may include adding staff.  Before you decide to hire full time, HRInsights has this rule of thumb:

Only hire full-time if sales are forecasted at a level necessary to maintain that person’s salary for at least a year.  If not, but you still need assistance, temporary employment may be the option for you.

Although there is a cost associated with hiring through temporary agencies, they are not as expensive as one might think.  The agency takes on the burden of finding the individual(s), paying the individual, paying taxes on their behalf, performing background/criminal checks and paying workers’ compensation costs.

Finding the right person can take a considerable amount of time; time you or your staff may not have.  HRInsights has found that the average number of resumes received for administrative positions is between 300 – 500.  Does your organization have the resources to sort through that many resumes, perform phone screens, in person interviews, make an offer, etc.?  Probably not.

When looking for a temporary agency, two questions to keep in mind are:

  • Is the agency slightly more expensive but provides additional value added services?
  • What is the agency’s own turnover rate internally in addition to that of their temporary workforce?

HRInsights has also found it critical to have one point person at the temporary agency with whom to communicate.  With one contact, you reduce confusion, improve the consistency of the candidates you screen, and, therefore, reduce the time needed to find the right worker for your particular needs.

If you have any small business HR issues, feel free to contact the HR professionals at www.hrinsights.com.

“The Small Business HR Resource”

 

 

Mobile Social Recruiting

The high volume demands of 2st century recruiting drive hiring professionals’ search for the next best thing for finding talent. Recruiters have always been quick on the uptake when it comes to new and innovative technology, especially if this technology makes it easier to stay connected. Lately, there’s a lot of buzz surrounding social recruiting and mobile recruiting – and many recruiters are blinldy jumping on the bandwagon. But what’s just buzz, and what will become a permanent part of every recruiter’s toolbox?

Mobile Recruiting, Mobile Recruiting & Social Recruiting

If you don’t know what I’m talking about when I say “moblie recruiting,” don’t feel bad. Though you’ve clearly been living a rock, I think it’s safe to assume you aren’t alone. So begore we answer my larger question, I think it would behoove us to establish exactly what we’re talking about.

When talking about mobile recruiting, there are two distinct things someone may be referring to. Mobile recruiting usually refers to tools and best practices for managing the recruiting process on the go. However, mobile recruiting can also refer to marketing and recruiting strategies that leverage SMS, QR code and mobile technology (a relatively new idea in the industry).

Social recruiting is the all-encompassing term for strategies leveraging social media outlets for sourcing and recruiting candidates. Some might argue that social recruiting is only reinventing the wheel – as hiring professionals have always drawn on their social networks – but this is something different. Social media is taking the wheel, and bringing it out of the Stone Age.

Mobile Recruiting: Apps and More

What started with the mobile phone has exploded into a new way of doing business. Mobile recruiting allows recruiters to do what they do best: stay connected. How? Apps. Recruiters love gadgets. And mobile apps are, like, so in right now. Beyond staples like LinkedInsmobileapp, there are a few recruiting apps that I really like.

  • JobScience puts the functionality of an applicant tracking system right into recruiters’ pockets. Access jobs, applications and contacts on the iPhone. Their nifty resume search completes this powerhouse package.
  • TrafficGeyser’s InstantCustomer is a handy gadget for business card and contact management. Snap a picture of the contact’s business card, and Instant Customer scans the contact info, creates a profile for the candidate, and allows you to send a pre-written follow-up.
  • Recruit2’s GlobalRecruitingRoundtable app gives users access to top industry news and trends, and allows them to plug in to a community of experts. The app also delivers some serious functionality (sharing capabilities, videos, full article library) while running on a straightforward interface.
  • JobSpeek wins the award for originality. This free app adds a new dimension to job postings: audio. When posting a job description, recruiters can record a “hiring message.” Your very original postings go live on JobSpeek, as well as the major job search engines. It’s just downright cool.

Mobile SMS and QR code recruiting is getting some serious attention in recent months. Many of the big-name innovators in talent acquisition are onthequest to get candidates using smartphones to connect with their organizations. However, recruiting leader and sourcing consultant GeoffPeterson says, “The technology’s not 100% there.” A lot of time and energy is going into developing this new avenue for recruiting, though, and I expect we’ll see more developments in the next year or so.

Social Recruiting: Plan for Your Slice of the Pie

Though recruiting has always been social, social media has opened an entirely new can of worms. And if you want a piece of the social recruiting pie, there are a few things you should keep in mind:

  • You need a strategy. You may have a Twitter account, but that doesn’t mean you have a social recruiting strategy.
  • Don’t bombard, engage. Anyone can post “an exciting opportunity” on LinkedIn. If that’s all your using your social media accounts for, however, you’re going to lose your audience fast.
  • Keep the social in social media. You can get all the Facebook fans and Twitter followers you want, but unless you’re engaging your network, they’re just numbers.

Do Social & Mobile Really Create an Improved Process?

Amidst all the social and mobile recruiting buzz, everyone is talking about an “improved process,” and gushing over the benefits of all of these great developments in recruiting technology. But this phrase strikes a chord with me. What, exactly, dictates “an improved hiring process?” Will all of these nifty apps and tools continue to drive the high-volume recruiting demands of the 21st century? Or will the automation of the more tedious processes give us the time to shift the focus back to what recruiting is all about (getting to know people)?

Based on your answer, you’ll be the one to decide what hip new trends are worth investing in.

About the Author: Kyle is the HR Analyst at Software Advice. He blogs about trends, technology and best practices in HR and recruiting by day, and drinks entirely too much wine by night.

Online Recruiting

Online recruiting: easy and reliable, right?  Sure if you use it correctly and you don’t solely depend on it.  There are a few issues that come along with online recruiting that you need to be aware of before you use it regularly.

In order to reach different groups, avoid discrimination and maintain diversity, make certain that your recruiting strategy includes a few different methods.  By relying on the internet, you narrow your search audience down and also open yourself up to discrimination accusations.

Also, you need to make sure to protect yourself from online viruses.  Make sure that whatever host receives your candidates online has a more stringent anti-virus filter as well as a dedicated individual or team of individuals regularly checking up on the host.  Be on the lookout for corporate employment sites seeking writing samples or other outside attached documents.

While you must keep an eye out for malicious incoming viruses, you must also hamper your urge to immediately delete the obvious discards.  Again, by automatically deleting the first wave of obvious rejects, you open yourself up to discrimination accusations.  Before deleting these applicants, print them off or save them in a file for at least a year along with any necessary paperwork.  Your company needs to clearly define an “applicant” and practice that policy.

Because e-mail is so easy, we sometimes become less formal in our communications with potential candidates.  However, e-mail is your paper trail in any legal case or as evidence of discrimination.  E-mails between recruiters and potential candidates need to remain formal, succinct and clear.  Most companies develop standard responses to the more frequently asked questions from potentials.

Lastly, make sure your “default” settings for the copy in your ad is compliant with your state regulations.  Generally, this default is set to federal standards regarding equal opportunity.  Check the settings and amend if necessary.

4 Considerations When Creating Your Employment Application

Recently, I wrote a blog about employers asking for Social Security numbers on employment applications. Well, I just heard about a couple more and I just can’t help but call them on the carpet: Jim Beam Global Spirits and Wine and Home Depot. I went on-line and actually experienced it for myself. Beam Global Spirits won’t let you complete the on-line application unless you provide it and Home Depot has it as part of their “account” sign-up process on their careers website.

I have been in business and HR for a long time and I can’t think of one reason why I would need a candidate’s social security number to complete an application.

Does this strike a chord with any of my HR colleagues? Do any business executives have any other perspective to share?

Other than sharing the embarrassment for their mishap, there are a few key messages that are important for employers:

1. Test your own application process (and forms) as a candidate. Would you put your social security number in the box?

2. Minimize real and perceived discrimination. Don’t put your company at risk by asking for unnecessary personal information from candidates. Candidates can accuse you of using this information inappropriately during the evaluation and selection process. Defending that can be time consuming and expensive.

3. When you need that information, ask the candidate for it and clearly explain why you need it and how it will be used. This minimizes any assumptions and accusations.

4. How would you like it? It doesn’t take any special degree, certification or specific experience to know when something is just not right. If you put yourself in the candidate’s or employee’s shoes, most often you will see what is right and what is wrong. It is worth taking a step out from behind the executive desk!

I would welcome a response from the Chief HR Officers at Beam (Mindy Mackenzie) and Home Depot (Tim Crow) to understand what possible reason they have for asking candidates for this information during the application process. And if they do respond, don’t even think about using the excuse that the information will be used later in the process. They will have to do better than that!